CONFERENCE REPORT

INTERMAG 2003

Boston, Massachusetts

March 30 - April 3, 2003.

PLENARY ADDRESS

Dr. John H. Marburger, III

Dr. John H. Marburger, III is Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President. Dr. Marburger also co-chairs the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology, and supports the President's National Science and Technology Council. Before his appointment in the Executive Office of the President, he served as Director of Brookhaven National Laboratory from 1998, and as the third President of the State University of New York at Stony Brook (1980-1994). Dr. Marburger attended Princeton University (B.A., Physics) and Stanford University (Ph.D., Applied Physics).

During his tenure as President, federally sponsored scientific research at SUNY Stony Brook grew to exceed that of any other public university in the northeastern United States.

As Director of the laboratory, Dr. Marburger carried out the mandates of the Department of Energy to improve management practices there.

Until 1980, Dr. Marburger was Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California, serving as Physics Department Chairman and Dean of the College of Letters, Arts and Sciences in the 1970's.

Dr. John H. Marburger, III is Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President. Dr. Marburger also co-chairs the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology, and supports the President's National Science and Technology Council. Before his appointment in the Executive Office of the President, he served as Director of Brookhaven National Laboratory from 1998, and as the third President of the State University of New York at Stony Brook (1980-1994). Dr. Marburger attended Princeton University (B.A., Physics) and Stanford University (Ph.D., Applied Physics).

Until 1980, Dr. Marburger was Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California, serving as Physics Department Chairman and Dean of the College of Letters, Arts and Sciences in the 1970's. At USC, Dr. Marburger focused on research in nonlinear optics, developing theories for various laser phenomena, and co-founded the Center for Laser Studies there. His teaching activities included "Frontiers of Electronics", a series of educational programs on CBS television.

During his tenure as President, federally sponsored scientific research at SUNY Stony Brook grew to exceed that of any other public university in the northeastern United States.

As Director of the laboratory, Dr. Marburger carried out the mandates of the Department of Energy to improve management practices there.

Dr. Marburger guided the opening and growth of the University Hospital and the development of the biological sciences as a major strength of SUNY Stony Brook. During his tenure as President, federally sponsored scientific research at SUNY Stony Brook grew to exceed that of any other public university in the northeastern United States. He also served on numerous boards and committees, including Chairmanship of the Governor's Commission on the Shoreham Nuclear Power Facility, and Chairmanship of the 80 campus "Universities Research Association", which operates Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and served as a Trustee of Princeton University and many other organizations. He also chaired the highly successful 1991/92 Long Island United Way Campaign.

In 1994, Dr. Marburger returned to the faculty at Stony Brook, teaching and doing research in optical science as a University Professor. In 1997 he became President of Brookhaven Science Associates, a partnership between the university and Battelle Memorial Institute, that won the competition for the contract to operate Brookhaven National Laboratory. As Director of the laboratory, Dr. Marburger carried out the mandates of the Department of Energy to improve management practices there. His company, Brookhaven Science Associates, continued to produce excellent science at the lab while achieving ISO14001 certification of the labís environmental management system, and winning back the confidence and support of the community.

The Office of Science and Technology Policy was established in 1976, with a broad mandate to advise the President and others within the Executive Office of the President on the impacts of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The OSTP is also authorized to lead an interagency effort to develop and to implement sound science and technology policies and budgets, and to work with the private sector, state and local governments, the science and higher education communities, and other nations toward this end. The OSTP also provides technical support to the Department of Homeland Security through a joint arrangement.

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CONFERENCE REPORT

INTERMAG 2003

Boston, Massachusetts

March 30 - April 3, 2003.

Recognitions

IEEE Magnetics Society Volunteer Recognition

The president of the IEEE Magnetics Society recognized the following three individuals who have dedicated their time and energies to helping us benefit most effectively from the IEEE who are stepping down from their present positions but we hope will remain actively involved. The Magnetics Society is in their debt.

Student Travel Awardees

Each year the IEEE Magnetics Society in coordination with the Education Committee and Awards Department recognizes many research students by awarding partial travel grants that assist in their participation in several major international magnetics conferences.

This year's cohort includes these 18 students. In addition, the Magnetics Society has embarked on an aggressive campaign and all student conferees who are not IEEE members will be given IEEE and Magnetics Society memberships.

Let's acknowledge the accomplishments of our next generation of magneticians.
Geoffry S. D. Beach Kang Ryong Choi
Tobias Hempel Adrian Hozoi
Du-Hyun Lee Jun Sig Kum
Yi-Chih Lai Yan Li
Shunichi Miyazawa Anton Plotkin
Kristina Zuzek Rozman Amarendra K. Singh
Weijun Tan Andy Thomas
Brian H. Thornton Tsung-Yu Wang
Haitao Xia Jose Francisco Diaz Zamora

New IEEE Fellows

The grade of IEEE Fellow has its roots from 1912. In that year, the AIEE revised its membership structure and established the grade of Fellow for those engineers who had demonstrated outstanding proficiency and had achieved distinction in their profession.

As it stands today, the IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the Board of Directors upon a person with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. A brief citation is issued to new Fellows describing their accomplishments and the total number selected in any one year cannot exceed one-tenth percent of the total voting Institute membership.

This year the Magnetics Society sponsored the first three individuals listed here, and the following lists new Fellows who are Magnetics Society members and were sponsored by another society.

Prof. Ronald Scott Indeck
Washington University

for contributions to information technology, especially advances in magnetic information storage security.

Dr. Yoshimasa Miura
Fujitsu, Shinshu University

for contributions and leadership in research and development of high-density magnetic storage technology.

Prof. Satish S. Udpa
Michigan State University

for contributions to the development of methods for solving inverse problems in the field of nondestructive evaluation.

Dr. William Joseph Gallagher
IBM

for contributions to the development of oxide-barrier tunnel junctions for superconducting and magnetic device applications.

Dr. Tomy Sebastian
Delphi Automotive Systems

for contributions to the theory, design, and application of permanent magnet motors and drives in automotive systems.

Dr. Zoltan Joseph Csendes
Ansoft Corporation

for contributions to the application of finite element modeling to microwave guides, structures and circuits.

Dr. Steven Noel Stitzer

for contributions to the field of ferrite microwave control devices.

Dr. Robert Emil Reinovsky
Los Alamos National Laboratory

for contributions to pulsed power science and technology.

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2003 IEEE MAGNETICS SOCIETY LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

The Magnetics Society of the IEEE honors one of its outstanding members each year for his or her lifelong professional achievement. This is the highest award of the Magnetics Society and is given for scientific, technical, and service contributions to the society.

Dr. Carl E. Patton

Dr. Carl E. Patton is Professor of Physics at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and a recipient of an IEEE Third Millennium Medal. Dr. Patton has a B.S. in Physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from California Institute of Technology.

Dr. Patton's group at CSU is involved in magnetics research on microwave and millimeter wave relaxation processes, Brillouin light scattering in magnetic films and super-lattices, hexagonal ferrite materials, ferromagnetic resonance, nonlinear spin wave processes, and envelope solitons in thin films.

Over the years, Dr. Patton has served the magnetics community in numerous ways, e. g., as Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Magnetics; as General or Publication Chair for several international magnetism conferences; as Chair of the newly formed American Physical Society Topical Group on Magnetism and its Applications; and, as a member of the International Organizing Committee for the International Conference on Ferrites.

Dr. Carl E. Patton is Professor of Physics at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and a recipient of an IEEE Third Millennium Medal. Dr. Patton has a B.S. in Physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from California Institute of Technology.

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IEEE MAGNETICS SOCIETY INFORMATION STORAGE AWARD

The IEEE honors one of its outstanding members each year for his or her contributions to information storage. This is the highest award of the IEEE given for scientific and technical contributions to information storage.

The IEEE Reynold B. Johnson Information Storage Award was established by the Board of Directors in 1991 and may be presented annually for outstanding contributions to information storage, with emphasis in the area of computer storage. It is named in honor of Reynold B. Johnson, who is renowned as a pioneer of magnetic disk technology and was founding manager of the IBM San Jose Research and Engineering Laboratory, San Jose, California in 1952, where IBM research and development in the field was centered.

1987 Sidney M. Rubens 1996 Nobutaka Imamura
1988 Jay W. Forrester 1997 Alan F. Shugart
1989 Reynold B. Johnson 1998 JeanPierre Lazzari
1990 Marvin Camras 1999 David A. Patterson, Randy H.
1991 Charles H. Coleman Katz, Garth A. Gibson
1992 Claude Shannon 2000 Mark H. Kryder
1993 John M. Harker 2001 Tu Chen
1994 C. Denis Mee 2002 Christopher Bajorek
1995 James U. Lemke

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2003 IEEE REYNOLD B. JOHNSON INFORMATION STORAGE AWARD

Dr. H. Neal Bertram

"For fundamental and pioneering contributions to magnetic recording physics research, applications and education."

Dr. H. Neal Bertra is an Endowed Chair Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of California at San Diego, associated with the Center for Magnetic Recording Research. Prior to joining UCSD, he was a member of the research department at Ampex Corporation, Redwood City, CA.

Dr. Bertrais a Fellow of the IEEE, and a recipient of the annual technical achievement award from the International Storage Industry Consortium. He was an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer in 1986. Dr. Bertram has a B.A. from Reed College in Portland, OR, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Harvard University.

Dr. Bertram's focus on research at Ampex Corp. was on magnetization reversal and general properties of particulate magnetic media. He developed models of the ac-biased recording process, generalized reciprocity, and saturation in write-transducers. He engaged in a variety of experimental studies of magnetic tape recording, focusing on high density signals and noise. Later he became involved in experimental studies of thin film disc media and the design of high frequency write pole tips. At UCSD, Dr. Bertram directs a research program in the physics of magnetic recording, including studies of polycrystalline thin film media, write and read transducers, fine particle tape systems and general analyses of ultimate limits in ultra high density recording. In these areas, his students engage in both experimental and theoretical studies of basic issues in high density magnetic recording, including noise phenomena, nonlinearities, dynamic processes, thermally induced relaxation and large scale numerical simulations of high density magnetic recording. Dr. Bertram has created graduate courses in magnetic recording theory, analysis of recording materials and magnetic recording measurements, and has published a book: Theory of Magnetic Recording (Cambridge University Press, March 1994). He has had a life-long interest in music, plays the cello, and gives concerts on occasion.

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IEEE Magnetics Society President Dr. Ron Indeck presents Dr. Carl E. Patton with the IEEE MAGNETICS SOCIETY LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD AT THE PLENARY SESSION OF INTERMAG 2003

IEEE Magnetics Society President Dr. Ron Indeck presents Dr. H. Neal Bertram with the IEEE REYNOLD B. JOHNSON INFORMATION STORAGE AWARD AT THE PLENARY SESSION OF INTERMAG 2003

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