MagNews


U.S. Congress Recognizes Seagate Engineer For Advancing Society, Culture And Commerce

Dr. Rajiv Ranjan commended for Leadership in Science and Technology

SCOTTS VALLEY, Calif.—16 June 2005— Seagate Technology (NYSE:STX) today announced that one of its Silicon Valley-based scientists, Dr. Rajiv Ranjan, has been recognized by a statement to the Congressional Record for leadership in science and technology. This special and rare acknowledgement was given for his extraordinary contribution and pioneering research work in the field of magnetic recording.

"My passion for discovery has allowed me to work with many brilliant people over the years at Seagate. Hearing my accolades on the Congressional floor was very moving," said Ranjan, executive director of research and development at Seagate's Fremont facility.

Seagate CEO Bill Watkins acknowledged Ranjan's 54 US patents in data storage and his contribution to data storage technology. "Innovation like Rajiv's is uniquely suited to a culture like Seagate's, where people are encouraged to take risks, look at things in new and unconventional ways, and where teamwork is at the heart of everything we do," said Watkins.

Ranjan patents have played an instrumental role in a variety of data-recording technology breakthroughs. The products Rajiv and his team have contributed to span not only computing markets, but are now being incorporated into consumer electronic products, such as portable music players, PDAs and cell phones.

Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren, who honored Ranjan for his work said, "Technical leaders like Rajiv Ranjan have been the lifeblood of Silicon Valley, and continue to prove that we remain on the leading edge of exciting new technologies."

Ranjan, a resident of San Jose, has worked at Seagate and its predecessor companies for 11 years.

About Seagate

Seagate is the worldwide leader in the design, manufacturing and marketing of hard disc drives, providing products for a wide-range of Enterprise, Desktop, Mobile Computing, and Consumer Electronics applications. Seagate's business model leverages technology leadership and world-class manufacturing to deliver industry-leading innovation and quality to its global customers, and to be the low cost producer in all markets in which it participates. The company is committed to providing award-winning products, customer support and reliability to meet the world's growing demand for information storage. Seagate can be found around the globe and at www.seagate.com.

Seagate, Seagate Technology and the Wave logo are U.S. registered trademarks of Seagate Technology LLC.

For further information, contact Brian Ziel, (831) 439-5429.

Hitachi Boosts Speed For Industrial-Strength Notebook Hard Drive

Higher Performance Ideal for Desktop-Replacement Systems


SAN JOSE, Calif. - May 11, 2005 - Hitachi Global Storage Technologies has set a new notebook performance record, announcing today worldwide availability of the fastest* 2.5-inch hard drive for mobile applications. The 7200 RPM Travelstar(tm) 7K100 is first to market with desktop-class performance on a 2.5-inch hard drive for notebook systems such as Dell's Inspiron XPS Gen 2 system.

With 100 gigabytes** (GB) of storage capacity, the Travelstar 7K100 is bigger, faster and stronger than its award-winning predecessor, creating an industrial-strength notebook hard drive. Hitachi's second-generation 7200 RPM 2.5-inch product offers a 67-percent storage-capacity increase and a 33-percent performance improvement (sustained data transfer rate) over the previous generation. In addition, a 50-percent improvement in operating shock tolerance gives users greater system reliability and data integrity. Within its class, the 7K100 features industry-leading 300 Gs and 1000 Gs operating and non-operating shock specifications, respectively.

"Hitachi created the 7200 RPM notebook hard drive segment in 2003 to give mobile users a performance rush; based on strong demand, we are now bringing an even more powerful product to the market," said Bill Healy, senior vice president, product strategy and marketing, Hitachi Global Storage Technologies. "We've learned much about the 7200 RPM notebook hard drives over the past several years and have applied that experience to create the quintessential performance product."

Users of notebook systems that employ the Travelstar 7K100 as the leading-edge storage component will experience a marked performance improvement in a variety of computing activities: Windows XP start-up, application loading, copying files and general HDD usage (playing an MP3 file, viewing pictures, browsing the Internet, etc.). Hitachi's benchmark testing of the 7K100 during these activities shows a 25-percent faster performance over the fastest competitive 2.5-inch 5400 RPM drive on the market (comparisons were made to 5400 RPM drives as no competitive 7200 RPM 2.5-inch drives were available for testing at time of announcement).

Desktop-Class Performance

The heightened level of performance, higher capacity and ruggedness on the 7K100 are intended to give greater mobility to power users who have traditionally looked to desktop systems for premium functionality. These include PC gamers, graphic arts designers, digital video editors, computer-aided-design engineers, as well as general users who demand the latest and best that notebook technology has to offer.

The Travelstar 7K100 significantly outperforms competitive notebook hard drives as well as some 3.5-inch desktop drives. In fact, Hitachi benchmark testings have shown as much as a 7-percent faster performance rate when compared against 7200 RPM desktop drives with a 2-megabyte cache.

"The leadership attributes that define the Travelstar 7K100 are indicative of the deep R&D resources we apply to our entire 2.5-inch hard drive product line," Healy added.

More For Speed

As the architect for the performance-focused 7200 RPM 2.5-inch hard drive segment, Hitachi has been working to grow the market and seed acceptance among users. Since mid-2003 when the category was launched, Hitachi has seen a notable shift toward higher-performing notebook systems due to a growing sophistication in the user base and to the aggressive movement to wireless computing. In response, Hitachi is actively planning to support this growth trend and expects to significantly expand its production of 7200 RPM 2.5-inch drives by the end of 2005.

"Notebook computer manufacturers are sensitive to the growing demand for more disk drive performance and capacity, and the Hitachi 7K100 responds to that demand," said John Donovan, vice president, TrendFOCUS. "While the 7200 RPM segment for notebooks is still a relatively small one, Hitachi's continued technology advancements will do much to accelerate the growth of this category."

To provide a broader set of options for customers, Hitachi has increased the number of capacity points in its 7200 RPM offering to 60, 80 and 100 GB. The Travelstar 7K100 PATA model is now shipping to customers worldwide in all capacities. Hitachi will also deliver a SATA version with 1.5 Gbits/second interface transfer rate*** in July. In addition, an enhanced availability (E7K100) model, offering 24x7 availability for blade server applications, will follow later this summer. All Travelstar 7K100 models are ROHS compliant.

White papers related to Hitachi's hard drive products, including 2.5-inch hard drive technologies, are available at the following web site: http://www.hitachigst.com/tech/techlib.nsf.

Technical Specifications

Travelstar 7K100 & E7K100
60/80/100 GB
9.5 mm in height
7200 rpm
66/66/81 billion bits per square inch maximum areal density
2/2/2 glass disk platter(s)
3/4/4 GMR recording head(s)
1000 G/1ms non-operating shock,
300 G/2ms operating shock
4.2 ms average latency
10 ms average read time/11 ms average write time
1.1 W active idle (PATA); 1.3 W (SATA) (not applicable for E7K100)
0.85W low-power idle (PATA); 1.0 W (SATA) (not applicable for E7K100)
100 MB/sec maximum interface transfer rate ATA-6 Ultra DMA mode-5 (PATA)
150 MB/sec interface transfer rate Serial ATA 1.5Gb/s
115 grams
2.6/2.6/2.6 Bels typical idle acoustics
3.0/3.0/3.0 Bels typical operating acoustics

* media transfer rate based on available specs - 629 (Hitachi) vs. 538.2 Mbits/second (from closest competitor)
** 1 gigabyte equals 1 billion bytes
*** includes enhanced features such as Native Command Queuing, Hot Plug, Staggered Spin-up
(tm)Travelstar is a trademark of Hitachi Global Storage Technologies in the United States and other countries. Other company, product and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.

About Hitachi Global Storage Technologies

Hitachi Global Storage Technologies was founded in 2003 as a result of the strategic combination of Hitachi's and IBM's storage technology businesses. Hitachi GST is the industry's second largest hard disk drive manufacturer in revenue.
The company's goal is to enable users to fully engage in the digital lifestyle by providing access to large amounts of storage capacity in formats suitable for the office, on the road and in the home. The company offers customers worldwide a comprehensive range of storage products for desktop computers, high-performance servers and mobile devices. For more information on Hitachi Global Storage Technologies, please visit the company's Web site at http://www.hitachigst.com.

About Hitachi, Ltd.


Hitachi, Ltd., (NYSE: HIT), headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, is a leading global electronics company with approximately 347,000 employees worldwide. Fiscal 2004 (ended March 31, 2005) consolidated sales totaled 9,027.0 billion yen ($84.4 billion). The company offers a wide range of systems, products and services in market sectors including information systems, electronic devices, power and industrial systems, consumer products, materials and financial services. For more information on Hitachi, please visit the company's Website at http://www.hitachi.com

Sun to Buy StorageTek for $4.1 Billion
Thursday June 2, 5:57 pm ET
By Matthew Fordahl, AP Technology Writer

Sun Microsystems to Buy StorageTek for $4.1 Billion to Try to Become One-Stop Tech Shop

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) -- Hoping to revive a business that still hasn't recovered from the Internet bust, Sun Microsystems Inc. agreed Thursday to buy Storage Technology Corp. for $4.1 billion in an attempt to capitalize on the digital age's flood of information.
Sun, which was a profitable Wall Street darling in the 1990s, isn't straying from its core business of making computers and software. Rather, it's to become a one-stop tech shop for companies, government agencies and other organizations, said Sun CEO Scott McNealy.

"We're actually putting together all the pieces here," he said in an interview.

Still, the acquisition of the company popularly known as StorageTek poses a risk for Sun, whose previous efforts in the area have failed to gain traction. On Thursday, Moody's Investors Service said it was putting Sun's debt rating under review for possible downgrade.

Shares of Sun fell 11 cents, or 2.8 percent, to close at $3.79 on the Nasdaq Stock Market. StorageTek shares soared more than 16 percent, or $5.13, to close at $36.36 in trading on the New York Stock Exchange.

Sun agreed to pay $37 per share in cash for the Louisville, Colo.-based company, representing an 18.5 percent premium over StorageTek's closing stock price Wednesday. The deal includes the assumption of StorageTek employee stock options.

"It's clearly a major event in the history of (information technology)," said Patrick Martin, StorageTek's CEO. "It joins together two of the industry's leading technology innovators."

StorageTek, founded in 1969, makes tape drives and network management and backup software for businesses and government agencies. In recent years, its business has grown by helping companies organize and store massive amounts of information.

But, like Sun, it also has a troubled past, including a 1984 bankruptcy filing and a 1999 reorganization. It has 7,100 employees compared with Sun's 32,000. Sun declined to say whether jobs would be cut.
In 2004, StorageTek reported a net income of $191 million on sales of $2.2 billion, compared with Sun's fiscal 2004 loss of $388 million on sales of $11.2 billion.

Sun said the deal will add to its operating profit in the first 12 months after it closes, expected in the late summer or early fall pending regulatory and shareholder approval. The boards of both companies have given their nods.

The deal is the biggest move by Santa Clara-based Sun since the Internet crash of 2000 devastated its sales and profits as cash-flooded dot-coms evaporated and corporate spending on information technology collapsed.

Though rivals have long since revived, Sun continued to founder despite a series of layoffs, reorganizations, strategy shifts and executive departures. Its server business was particularly hard hit by the popularity of less expensive hardware and software such as servers built with Intel Corp. chips and the Linux operating system.

In recent quarters, Sun appears to have stabilized, though profitability hasn't been consistent, as it has revamped both hardware and software products, signed a truce with archrival Microsoft Corp. and launched subscription-based program licensing.

Still, despite steep losses and shrinking revenue, Sun has managed to maintain more than $7.4 billion in cash and marketable securities, according to its most recent financial report. However, the acquisition will shrink that reserve, leaving Sun with less of a cushion in case integration goes awry.

Analysts also questioned how the acquisition will drive growth.

"We do question the rationale of a transaction which reduces Sun's cash hoard by 40 percent, and does nothing to re-ignite revenue growth or profitability," Steven Fortuna, an analyst at Prudential Equity Group, said in a research note. "We would rather have seen the company buy back a billion shares and fire 10,000 people."

Gordon Haff, an analyst at the research firm Illuminata, said acquiring StorageTek would distance Sun from its past and make the company more closely resemble its archrivals Hewlett-Packard Co. and IBM Corp.

"If Sun really can pull off this integration, it really does make them much more of the one-stop, integrated computer systems company than they've ever been in the past," Haff said. "In a way, it's a very different culture for Sun."

But McNealy, who once famously compared the 2002 mega-merger of HP and Compaq Computer Corp. to the collision of two garbage trucks, said the combination of Sun and StorageTek is a good fit.

"As soon as this thing closes, the way to do it is just staple the two price lists together," he said. "That's about as much serious product marketing that is necessary in phase one. It's quite complementary."

Sun, however, is no stranger to merger headaches. In 2000, it attempted to bolster its presence in low-end server offerings with the $2 billion all-stock purchase of Cobalt Networks Inc. Three years later, it effectively killed off the product line.

McNealy said Sun hasn't seen success in storage previously because it wasn't as big as other industry players such as EMC Corp. That won't be an issue after Sun acquires StorageTek's field support and sales team.

"Against the storage competitors like EMC, the one knock they had against us was that we weren't serious, that we didn't have a critical mass and mission-critical support capability in the sales environment," he said. "All of a sudden now, we have all of that."

Spin-valve Bench
Advanced spintronics device design and analysis software,
Euxine Technologies LLC, Dayton, Ohio, USA

Euxine Technologies released in June of 2005 the maiden Version 1.0 of its new Spin-valve Bench (SVB) software for Microsoft Windows operating systems. This product is positioned as an affordable, turnkey, modeling environment for engineers and scientists engaged in the design and analysis of advanced spintronic devices such as multi-layer MRAM cells and MR read-head sensors. The application blends a friendly and versatile user interface with an accurate computation engine that rigorously accounts for three-dimensional micromagnetic interactions. Giant-magnetoresistance (GMR) and anisotropic-magnetoresistance (AMR) calculations are based on realistic models that reflect the micro-structural, current-distribution and spin-torque properties of a device. Also available are the thermal modeling of device components and the modeling of devices in current-in-plane (CIP) and current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) electrical circuit configurations.

The data-input areas of the software are organized in intuitive categories for easy problem set up. A user can easily create a device by adding and independently specifying the characteristics of the device components, and can then apply external fields in order to calculate magnetic states and generate magnetization, GMR and AMR transfer curves. An exclusive time-saving feature of the software is a new-design window that offers up a retinue of popular start-up templates to choose from. The user has at his or her disposal a convenient context-sensitive online help facility and ready access to the following optimization and productivity tools (separate applications in their own right): Cellider (an array-patterning tool) and MagJob (a background, batch-job submission and monitoring tool).

To learn more about the SVB software visit us at http://www.euxine.com/svb, and to request for a free evaluation license send us an email at svb@euxine.com.

Company contact:
Dr. John Oti,
joti@euxine.com

Lacie And Hitachi Collaborate To Deliver Industry's Largest Capacity External Storage Solutions

500GB Hitachi Deskstar Hard Drives Provide Advanced Features and Renowned Quality

NEW YORK CITY @ DV Expo (July 20, 2005) - LaCie and Hitachi, two pioneers of innovative hard drive technology and design, today announced a collaboration to deliver three external hard drives with record capacities for both consumer and enterprise users. LaCie selected 500GB Hitachi Deskstar 7K500 hard drives for its 2TB Biggest F800, 500GB Ethernet Disk mini and 2TB Bigger Disk Extreme storage solutions. Hitachi has incorporated a number of unique design features that make its 500GB hard drive well-suited for use in digital video editing, multi-drive RAID storage and numerous other high-bandwidth applications.

"We are pleased to expand our relationship with LaCie to include their latest high-capacity external storage solutions," said Steve Pereira, director, Hitachi Global Storage Technologies Europe Limited. "LaCie and Hitachi are both known for providing customers with breakthrough features, unique design and cutting-edge technology. LaCie is using 500GB Deskstar hard drives to deliver external storage solutions with massive capacities and that are easy to use for both consumer and enterprise customers."

"LaCie is excited to work with Hitachi to deliver the largest capacity hard drives solutions on the market," says Olivier Mirloup, LaCie Senior Product Manager. "LaCie has a history of developing award-winning storage solutions and Hitachi's ongoing leadership in the internal hard drive industry makes this pairing a natural fit. Linking our strengths will be a great benefit to our customers."

Hitachi Deskstar drives will provide LaCie customers with industry-leading capacity and award-winning performance. Several Deskstar 7K500 design attributes combine to enhance system performance and usability, including fast data transfer rates, low power consumption and "Smooth Stream" technology, an advanced error recovery process designed to improve digital content management.

The following LaCie solutions include 500GB Hitachi Deskstar 7K500 internal hard drives:

  • LaCie Biggest F800 is a RAID subsystem offering a higher level of data protection
    for professionals with secure storage for 2TB data. The 4-bay array supports RAID levels 0, 0+1, 5 and RAID 5+hot spare in a sturdy aluminum enclosure with FireWire 800 and Hi-Speed USB 2.0 interfaces for use on PCs or Macs. Biggest F800 allows for easy installation of four arrayed disks with no driver required. Should the system overheat or a drive fail, the Biggest F800's smart alarm will notify the administrator via an audible sound and automatically begin rebuilding a faulty drive for those using RAID 5.
  • LaCie Ethernet Disk mini is an affordable network hard drive for use in homes or small offices with 500GB shared storage space. Anyone plugged into the dual-purpose Ethernet Disk mini can instantly share files via the fast Ethernet connection without having to install drivers, or the drive can be attached via USB 2.0 to any individual computer for faster throughput and a private connection. Designed for small office and home environments, the user-friendly LaCie Ethernet Disk mini is plug and play - no prior networking experience is required.
  • LaCie Bigger Disk Extreme is a compact and sturdy drive designed to support multi-stream audio/video editing in a variety of formats with burst transfer rates reaching up to 85MB/s and unrivaled 2TB capacity. A true plug-and-play device, the LaCie Bigger Disk Extreme has a built-in RAID 0 configuration that allows for instant high-speed data transfers of up to 85MB/s and immediate large-scale backup without the need for complicated setup. LaCie Bigger Disk Extremes are hot-pluggable for file sharing among FireWire 800/400 and iLink/DV workstations. No drivers or software installation is required for those using Windows XP, Windows 2000 or Mac OS X operating systems.


LaCie drives are available immediately worldwide direct from LaCie or through the company's specialized dealer network. For more information, visit www.lacie.com.

About LaCie

LaCie creates external storage solutions and color monitors that help professionals and everyday users easily manage their digital lives. Powerful technology combined with unique designs by the internationally acclaimed Philippe Starck, Neil Poulton and Porsche Design GmbH make LaCie the world leader in storage innovation. Established in France in 1989, LaCie is now headquartered in North America, Europe and Asia and listed on the Paris Nouveau Marché (code 5431). For more information, visit www.lacie.com.
************

Hitachi Global Storage Technologies is introducing a new 2.5-inch hard drive, with several features that will make it a leading contender in the notebook and consumer electronics markets. The 4,200 rpm Hitachi Travelstar 4K120 hard drive uses new technology developed by Hitachi that:

  • Makes power consumption 30% more efficient, via Hivert (Hitachi Voltage Efficiency Regulator), extending battery life by up to 20 minutes on average.
  • Creates cooler operation. With hard drives among the top three heat producers in laptop computers, the 4K120's significantly lower heat dissipation will reduce the overall heat emission of notebooks for greater lap comfort. In CE environments, the cooler-running hard drive can be used in a new category of smaller, entry-level DVRs intended for spaces such as bedrooms, where quieter operation is possible as fans are not required for cooling the host device.

About Hitachi Global Storage Technologies

Hitachi Global Storage Technologies was founded in 2003 as a result of the strategic combination of Hitachi's and IBM's storage technology businesses. Hitachi GST is the industry's second largest hard disk drive manufacturer in revenue.

The company's goal is to enable users to fully engage in the digital lifestyle by providing access to large amounts of storage capacity in formats suitable for the office, on the road and in the home. The company offers customers worldwide a comprehensive range of storage products for desktop computers, high-performance servers and mobile devices. For more information on Hitachi Global Storage Technologies, please visit the company's Web site at http://www.hitachigst.com.

About Hitachi, Ltd.

Hitachi, Ltd., (NYSE: HIT), headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, is a leading global electronics company with approximately 347,000 employees worldwide. Fiscal 2004 (ended March 31, 2005) consolidated sales totaled 9,027.0 billion yen ($84.4 billion). The company offers a wide range of systems, products and services in market sectors including information systems, electronic devices, power and industrial systems, consumer products, materials and financial services. For more information on Hitachi, please visit the company's Website at http://www.hitachi.com.